Is it sustainable if it’s expensive?

Consumers of all ages have the option to buy new or buy vintage, with the two options often being the same price or else the vintage often more.

Call me Andrea Sachs, but from the noughties ’til the present day, my relationship with clothes has been difficult.

With no natural proclivity towards popular fashion “norms”, I spent my teenage years in my favourite men’s jeans or else overworn and torn, corduroy flares. And I loved those corduroy flares!

Needless to say, I didn’t quite fit in with my Top Shop, Kookai, Jane Norman, New Look-wearing peers.

But the young millennials of my time were not like the more enlightened generation Z who followed.

In our current 2020s, young people know they should make sure to express their genuine-selves at all times.

They wear what they want, they hold their heads high, and they don’t care what the “cooler kids” think.

In recent years, the takeover of vintage stores and pre-loved shopping has brought older-style fashions into the mainstream.

Consumers of all ages have the option to buy new or buy vintage, with the two options often being the same price or else the vintage often more.

My teenage self in her baggy, boyish clothes would have felt inspired by the variety of unique, vintage items available today! 

And although fashion has presented us all with the option to buy new clothes cheap, the items with longevity often prove to be those which are preloved.

Hundreds of thousands of tonnes of textile waste end up on British landfills every year. Places where many of my own old, poor quality fast-fashion purchases lay waste amongst so many others.

If more of us make the decision to buy responsibly then we can reduce that waste, and benefit from better made, longer lasting clothes.

I began visiting charity shops for necessity. I found many things I needed but I desired many more options.

If charity and vintage stores can grow in prominence, then more and more good quality, second-hand items will be available to consumers.

Less items will be reduced to landfill and a reduction in textile waste will serve to help ease environmental pollution.

It’s not a dream if it’s possible!

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